32 Things you can do today

Raring to go? Great! Here's a list you can get going on right away!
 

First three:

  1. Take Stock
    Take a formal audit of the women within your agency creative department. Share this with us here at Creative Equals in exchange for our badge as a signal to female creatives outside and inside your company that you’re committed to diversity. And, you’re actively working to redress the imbalance.
     
  2. Start from Within
    Take a look at the female creatives you have in your creative department. Do you have junior talent to develop? A senior ripe for an ACD role? Make sure they know what it takes to move ‘up one rung’.
     
  3. Talk it up
    Learn that if you are not talking about your involvements and accomplishments they will more than likely go unnoticed. Many women wait for recognition from above rather than sharing all of the good stuff along the way. As Nina DiSesa says in her book, be the squeaky wheel. Get noticed.

How the Gender Pay Gap Works (Podcast)

Stuff you should know is a podcast used to educate the public about common things and how they work. In April 2016, they covered the Gender Pay Gap in the US. They discuss how the gender pay gap is the amount of time into the next year a woman must work to earn as much as a man did the previous year. How those figures are collected, what causes these trends and what we can do to reduce the gap. Well worth a listen.

Mentoring

SheSays is an SheSays is an award-winning organization running free mentorship and events to women in the creative industry. Why? Because they want to see more women at the top. 

Their mentorship scheme ‘Who’s Yr Momma’ is active in New York, London, Sydney, Melbourne, Chicago, Los Angeles, Bournemouth, and Stockholm. Mentorship is free and open to all women in the advertising and marketing industry, from all backgrounds, at any level.

Gender Politics - The Surprising Secret to Being a Good Boss

Have you heard of Kim Scott (@kimballscott)? She's has built her career around a simple goal: Creating bullshit-free zones where people love their work and working together. With a history as a start up CEO, a director at Google and a faculty member of Apple University, she's been around the block a time or two. 

Heres the beginning of an article she wrote with First Round: 

In honor of International Women’s Day yesterday, I want to explore why gender issues make it harder for both men and women to be candid at work, and to suggest some ideas for addressing the problem. Here’s the short version:

Gender politics and fear of tears push men away from being as radically candid with women as they are with other men. This is bad for men, women and the truth. Gender bias pushes women away from being radically candid in a way that is also bad for men, women and the truth.

BAD BOSSES MAKE PEOPLE MISERABLE.

THEY ALSO KILL INNOVATION, STIFLE GROWTH, INCREASE COSTS, AND CREATE INSTABILITY. WELL-MEANING PEOPLE BECOME BAD BOSSES WITHOUT EVEN REALIZING IT.

Great bosses have relationships with each of their employees. This relationship is a source of growth and stability for individuals and companies. Anywhere I’ve observed a great boss, I’ve seen the same three principles for approaching this relationship play out.  I’ll describe these principles mostly by telling stories, some successes, but also plenty of mistakes—mostly mine. Some are funny, some are painful, and many are plain embarrassing, but they’re all instructive.

Even if your company is nothing like the places I’m describing (Google, Apple, Twitter) and your own boss is a control freak or petty tyrant or simply useless, you can still adopt these three basic principles and become a great boss yourself. I’ll explain how, and why you’ll be happy you did.

I. Say what you think.

This may not sound like a big deal, but it is so difficult and rare I call it “radical candor” when it happens. Steve Jobs explained it  like this: “You need to [criticize] in a way that does not call into question your confidence in [an employee’s] abilities but leaves not too much room for interpretation… and that’s a hard thing to do.” Criticizing employees can feel brutal, and praising them can feel patronizing. But guidance—praise and criticism—is the single most important thing a boss is responsible for. Giving guidance is just the beginning. Great bosses must also get it (especially criticism) from employees, and encourage it between them.  

II. Telling people what to do doesn’t work.

This also seems obvious. Yet, too many people think a boss’s job is to tell people what to do. It’s not. To do great work, employees must feel free. There’s nothing more destructive to great work than authoritarianism. Great bosses help a team move in a unified direction not by telling them what to do, but by guiding them through a process that involves a lot of listening, arguing, cajoling, and then letting go of ego to learn from the outcomes of those decisions. This process is exhausting for everybody, and so there’s pressure on the boss to short circuit it and tell people what to do. Resisting that pressure and forcing themselves and their teams through the process, called “the thrash” at Apple and “getting mugged by pigeons” at Google, is key to getting the best work from employees. Great bosses are editors, not authors.

 

III. Give a Damn

GREAT BOSSES HELP THEIR EMPLOYEES TAKE A STEP IN THE DIRECTION OF THEIR DREAMS.  THEY MAKE A REAL EFFORT TO HELP EMPLOYEES ACHIEVE NOT JUST PROFESSIONAL BUT PERSONAL GROWTH. EQUALLY IMPORTANT, THEY RECOGNIZE AND VALUE THE PEOPLE WHO ARE EXCELLENT AT THEIR JOBS BUT ARE NOT GUNNING FOR THE NEXT PROMOTION. THESE PEOPLE ARE THE SOURCE OF STABILITY ON ANY TEAM. GREAT BOSSES INTEGRATE GROWTH AND STABILITY, PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL GROWTH. GREAT BOSSES GIVE A DAMN.


Research Sound Bites

  • Almost two-thirds of male senior leaders are hesitant to have one-on-one meetings with a more junior woman. As a result, men end up mentoring Start from within. other men, and women miss out. (Source)
     
  • Studies show success and likeability are positively correlated for men and negatively correlated for women. When a man is successful, his peers often like him more; when a woman is successful, both men and women often like her less. This trade-off between success and likeability creates a double-bind for women. If a woman is competent she does not seem nice enough, but if a woman seems really nice, she is considered less competent. This can have a big impact on a woman’s career. Recognise these tendencies and use set goals as the judgement of competence not personality. (Source)
     
  • Women's representation has grown, but is lower on executive committees than on boards (Source)
     
  • Studies show men will apply for jobs when they meet 60% of hiring criteria, while women wait until they meet 100%. (Source)
     
  • Companies With More Women Board Directors Experience Higher Financial Performance (Source)
     
  • Sponsorship makes women more likely to aim high. Women with sponsors are 8 percent more likely to ask for both a stretch assignment and a pay increase than women without sponsors (Source)
     
  • Women are four times less likely to negotiate than men. When they do negotiate, women typically ask for 30 percent less money. (Source)
     
  • Women are less likely to negotiate for themselves than men, often because they are concerned they’ll be viewed unfavorably. (Source)
     
  • In one study, three additional words on a résumé — “member of PTA” — made a woman 79 percent less likely to be hired. (Source)
     
  • Women constitute five percent of S&P 500 CEOs and have just 19 percent of corporate board seats, 25 percent of C-level positions, and 19 percent of Congressional seats. (Source)

Reports

  • The Sponsor Effect: Breaking Through the Last Glass Ceiling (2010, Source)
     
  • Women Matter, Making the Breakthrough (2012, Source)
     
  • 8 Tips for Managers #LeanInTogether (Source)
     
  • Female Creative Directors on the Rise. A 2014 Study of women serving as Creative Directors from the 3% Conference (2015, Source)

Repicturing Women

Elena Rossini, director of The Illusionists, and Pam Grossman from Getty Images presents "Repicturing Women." From 3% conference 2014.

Insecurity sells. The objectified, sexualized images often seen in the media and advertising don’t reflect what extraordinary women look like in real life. So what’s the point? These photo shopped, idealized images make women feel bad about themselves and motivate them to buy products in the hope they will attain the unattainable. Filmmaker Elena Rossini, who created the soon to be released film, The Illusionists and Pam Grossman of Getty Images discuss how they’re helping promote imagery that is more accurate and empowering through their films and LeanIn imagery collection.

Here's the talk from the conference