• Almost two-thirds of male senior leaders are hesitant to have one-on-one meetings with a more junior woman. As a result, men end up mentoring Start from within. other men, and women miss out. (Source)
     
  • Studies show success and likeability are positively correlated for men and negatively correlated for women. When a man is successful, his peers often like him more; when a woman is successful, both men and women often like her less. This trade-off between success and likeability creates a double-bind for women. If a woman is competent she does not seem nice enough, but if a woman seems really nice, she is considered less competent. This can have a big impact on a woman’s career. Recognise these tendencies and use set goals as the judgement of competence not personality. (Source)
     
  • Women's representation has grown, but is lower on executive committees than on boards (Source)
     
  • Studies show men will apply for jobs when they meet 60% of hiring criteria, while women wait until they meet 100%. (Source)
     
  • Companies With More Women Board Directors Experience Higher Financial Performance (Source)
     
  • Sponsorship makes women more likely to aim high. Women with sponsors are 8 percent more likely to ask for both a stretch assignment and a pay increase than women without sponsors (Source)
     
  • Women are four times less likely to negotiate than men. When they do negotiate, women typically ask for 30 percent less money. (Source)
     
  • Women are less likely to negotiate for themselves than men, often because they are concerned they’ll be viewed unfavorably. (Source)
     
  • In one study, three additional words on a résumé — “member of PTA” — made a woman 79 percent less likely to be hired. (Source)
     
  • Women constitute five percent of S&P 500 CEOs and have just 19 percent of corporate board seats, 25 percent of C-level positions, and 19 percent of Congressional seats. (Source)